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20130201
20130228
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6 (some duplicates have been removed)
flights in and out of boston. while the worst of the storm has yet to hit, many businesses and cities were busy making prarations today. erika ller repor. >> reporter: this monstrous storm is already being compared to the great blizzard of '78, when vast amounts of snow blanketed the ohio valley and the great lakes. that storm lasted 36 hours, leaving cars stranded. this storm could also be historic. weather forecasters predict it will leave up to three feet of snow in a wide swath stretching from new york to boston. preparations are well underway. airlines cancelled nearly 4,500 flights, leaving many travelers stranded. >> here at laguardia, as you can see, our port authority men and women are hard at work preparing for the storm. our fleet of snow removal vehicles and sand and agent spreaders are prepped and ready for action. >> reporter: amtrak has also canceled many trips in the northeast. the storm is expected to deliver a harsh blow to areas of the east coast still recovering from superstorm sandy. >> hurricane sandy cost the economy a $100 billion and the recovery efforts are still
: in new york city and elsewhere, preparations are being made for clean-up. >> we have more than 250,000 tons of salt on hand. >> reporter: according to the long island power authority, the storm has the potential to cause power outages for 100,000 customers on long island. and for the first time ever, lipa is deferring storm operations and response to its subcontractor, national grid. but in manhattan today, it was mostly business as usual, although many workers did try to leave early to beat the snow. and if the snowfall is anywhere close to the storm of '78, you'll see the impact in economic data in the weeks ahead. >> usually major storms cause increased volatility in economic data. so, that jobless claims jump significantly in the beginning as government offices close, because of the storm. and they surge back up after the offices reopened. >> reporter: if there's a silver lining in this storm, it's the timing. the heaviest snowfall will happen over the weekend. and the clean-up is expected well before valentines day, which contributes $18 billion to the economy. erika miller,
Search Results 0 to 5 of about 6 (some duplicates have been removed)